Chinese Food Recipes Noodles Chicken

Noodles are a staple in Chinese cooking, whether thick or thin, sold fresh or dry, or or made with rice, wheat, or mung bean flour. Here is the most popular Chinese food recipes noodles chicken. Enjoy!

 

Chicken Chow Mein with Vegetables Recipe

On takeout menus across the country, chow mein is one of several Chinese noodle dishes that are popular. The word “chow” means fried in Chinese and the word “mein” means noodle (hence the name for another popular dish, lo mein), so chow mein is a dish of fried noodles, along with a flavorful sauce, a protein, and vegetables.

To make chow mein noodles is a simple process, you can use store-bought spaghetti (in a pinch) or you can purchase Asian noodles specifically made for Chinese noodle dishes. Feel free to substitute pork or shrimp for the chicken.

 

Chinese Food Recipe Noodles

Chinese Food Recipe Noodles

 

See also: Air Fryer Garlic and Parsley Baby Potatoes Recipe

 

Ingredients

  • 2 boneless and skinless chicken breasts (around 7 to 8 ounces each)
  • 1 pound mung bean sprouts

 

For the Marinade:

  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon oyster sauce
  • Dash pepper
  • Dash salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon cornstarch

 

For the Sauce:

  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1/4 cup low-sodium chicken broth (or water)
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon oyster sauce
  • Dash pepper
  • Dash salt

 

For the Noodles and Vegetables:

  • 2 medium ribs celery
  • 1/2 pound dry wonton noodles
  • 1 pound bok choy (or broccoli)
  • 1/2 red onion
  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 1/2 pound fresh mushrooms
  • 1 green onion
  • 1/4 cup toasted sesame seeds
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil

 

Chicken Chow Mein with Vegetables Recipe

Chicken Chow Mein with Vegetables Recipe

 

See also: Best Snickerdoodles Recipe

 

Steps to Make It

  1. Gather the ingredients.
  2. One or two hours before cooking, rinse the mung bean sprouts so that they have time to drain thoroughly.
  3. In a bowl, combine the marinade ingredients, adding the cornstarch last, and mix well.
  4. Cut the chicken into thin strips and add to the marinade; let sit for 20 to 25 minutes.
  5. Meanwhile, prepare the sauce. In a small bowl, dissolve the cornstarch with the water.
  6. Add the chicken broth, oyster sauce, soy sauce, salt, and pepper; mix well and set aside.
  7. Cook the noodles in boiling salted water until soft.
  8. Immediately plunge into cold water to stop the cooking process; then drain thoroughly.
  9. Cut the celery and bok choy into 1/2-inch pieces on the diagonal. (If substituting broccoli for bok choy, peel the stalks until no more strings come out, and slice thinly on the diagonal.)
  10. Slice the mushrooms and cut the red bell pepper into chunks.
  11. Chop the onion and dice the green onion.
  12. Heat a wok or frying pan over medium-high to high heat. Add 2 tablespoons oil. When the oil is hot, add the noodles. Fry in batches until golden. Remove the noodles from the pan.
  13. Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons oil. Add the onion and the chicken, cooking briefly until the chicken is becoming brown and until nearly cooked through. Remove the chicken and onion from the pan.
  14. Cook the rest of the vegetables separately (excluding the green onion and mung bean sprouts), seasoning each with a bit of salt while stir-frying if desired.
  15. When cooking the bok choy or broccoli, add 1/4 cup of water and cover until cooked through.
  16. Remove each of the vegetables from the pan when finished stir-frying and add more oil as needed before cooking the next vegetable.
  17. Give the sauce a quick stir.
  18. Add the chicken and vegetables back into the wok, making a “well” in the middle for the sauce.
  19. Pour in the sauce, stirring quickly to thicken and mix everything together.
  20. Stir in the green onions and mung bean sprouts.
  21. Place the noodles on a platter and pour the cooked vegetable, chicken, and sauce mixture on top.
  22. Garnish the chow mein with the toasted sesame seeds.
  23. Serve and enjoy!

 

Source: www.thespruceeats.com

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Victoria F. Quarterman

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